Amazing Plant Grows Both Tomatoes and Potatoes, AKA Ketchup and Fries

TomTato

Imagine a world where your favorite food combos could grow on one plant. A chicken and waffle tree, perhaps? Or maybe a Nutella crepe bush? Well, science is getting it all started with the TomTato plant — a vine of cherry tomatoes attached to potato roots. Or, as I like to see it, the ketchup and fries plant.

So maybe it’s not as indulgent as the former suggestions, but I think we can all agree this is one cool creation by horticultural company Thompson & Morgan. Apparently, tomatoes and potatoes are in the same plant family (and they call the former a fruit, bah!), so the combination actually makes sense.

The science behind it goes something like this: the fruit and vegetable are initally planted and grown separately, but after a few weeks, the tomatoes are cut off the stem. Then they’re matched up to potato stems, eventually fusing together to create nutritional pathways. Both foods remain just as they would solo, the only difference being shared energy sources. Thus, the TomTato is born!

Check it out in action below:

Now that we’ve had our daily dose of science, where the ketchup and fries at?!

H/T NBC News 



Cameron is a Philadelphia native who is borderline obsessed with chocolate, coffee and sushi. She writes for TheFW and The Daily Meal, and making a mean chocolate chip cookie is her specialty. She also tries pizza everywhere she travels in hopes someday she'll become one of those cool pizza snobs.



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  • The Vulgar Chef

    ill be growing a crop of these next summer.

  • Anonymous

    Um, these are not new. They had them in the 70s. They just never caught on.

    • Kit Fritters

      Yup, called the “pomato” back then, it works but not economically viable. Except on an enormous scale.

  • Nico

    Maybe I misread. But there is no seed for this. So with other words, if you don’t keep growing normal tomatoes and potatoes and doing this, no more TomTato or Pomato or any other kind of rubbishato plant. Why is this science? They cant reproduce. They cant grow like this without anyone doing this to each and every one of them. Waste of time and money?

    • Hagane No Enjinia

      It cuts down space requirements, soil nutrition demands and work time by almost 50%.
      Sounds good to me. Besides they have been doing this to fruit trees for centuries.

  • http://www.withoutcapricorns.net/ Svoreign

    No seed is a little disappointing I agree, but this is mostly aimed at passionate gardeners who want to try and create something cool. My dad would probably give it a go.