7 Lucky Foods for New Year’s Eve

There’s lot of things you can do to guarantee an awesome 2012, but the easiest thing starts with eating right. Make sure these foods are included in your holiday spread to welcome the new year. I wonder if someone out there will be making a burrito of all the following goodies. That would be a great way to get everything in, in one bite.

Enjoy, you superstitious #foodbeasts:

  1. Greens such as lettuce are supposedly eaten on New Year’s Eve because they resembles money and prosperity. For you paper chasers, you might want to get into some salad!
  2. Beans also resemble money but specifically coins. If your NYE is a bust, shake it on over to some 24-hour Mexican joint and order up a bean burrito.
  3. Fish is not only lucky because there is an abundance of it but the scales also represent wealth. Scale me up!
  4. Fruit such as figs represent fertility. Keep me multiplying! Or, if you’re looking for some additional birth control, maybe just skip on those Fig Newtons this year.
  5. Noodles and grains symbolize longevity. Don’t skimp on the chow mein this year!
  6. Pork is especially lucky because they “root forward and are rotund.” Damn, to clog my arteries or have good luck? Decisions, decisions.
  7. Cake is often eaten on New Year’s because it’s a symbol of indulgence and that’s key for healthy stress relief.

Unlucky New Years eats include chicken because “they could fly away with your luck” and lobster because “they walk backwards.” So just because you can splurge on some expensive lobster, doesn’t necessarily mean you should.

Have a happy, safe, and prosperous 2012!

[via rd.com]



Lucia Phan has a Bachelors Degree from the University of California, Berkeley in Food & City Culture and Environmental Economics. She is the founder of Banana Slug Edibles, where she bakes specialty cakes and cupcakes for patients in Orange County & Los Angeles. In her free time she likes to collect recipes and will forever be searching for the best chocolate chip cookie recipe known to man.



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